We provide news, commentary, articles, links and information about events, services, resources and newsletters covering a wide range of topics and issues of relevance to men and boys from newspapers, magazines, websites, books, journals, practitioners and institutions. Our mythbusters section critiques inaccurate, biased and stereotypical reports about men, boys and gender issues, and encourages factual reporting in stories concerning males.
Public health has been described as "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals."[51] It is concerned with threats to the overall health of a community based on population health analysis. The population in question can be as small as a handful of people or as large as all the inhabitants of several continents (for instance, in the case of a pandemic). Public health has many sub-fields, but typically includes the interdisciplinary categories of epidemiology, biostatistics and health services. Environmental health, community health, behavioral health, and occupational health are also important areas of public health.
Here at Real Life Women's Health we approach each woman as a whole person with unique, individual needs. Building a strong, trusting and understanding relationship with each client is foundational to our work. We deeply believe that women don't need more information on how to be "healthy" or another protocol to follow. Rather we believe you have all the wisdom you need right inside you. Instead of telling people what to do, we come alongside our clients by educating, empowering and helping them to create space for listening so they can tap into that inner wisdom and internal body cues as a means to lasting, long term health and wellbeing - physically, mentally and emotionally. Whether you're recovering from an eating disorder or facing a health issue, you are the expert of your body. 
Her own health journey with disordered eating, amenorrhea and hypothyroidism has been the catalyst to her career focused on women's health and eating disorders. As both a Board Certified Family Nurse Practitioner and Registered Dietitian, Robyn specializes in helping women heal from hormone & reproductive health issues and recover from eating disorders and disordered eating.
I am in the Army at Fort Benning.  I had trouble with my knees and the doctors were contemplating surgery.  My mom sent me some Joint Health and told me to take 4 a day.  Shortly after I shared with my mom that the Joint Health has helped me with my knees and I am able to run better and I have so much more energy.  I cannot imagine not having my JOINT HEALTH.  Thank you to my mom for sharing and Core Health for providing the best!!!
All WIC RDs: Please respond directly to Dawn Ballosingh, WH DPG Chair, at dballosingh@oneworldomaha.org to collate on behalf of the group or fill out the form and send it to Mark (mrifkin@eatright.org) directly. Deadline is November 2nd. The Policy Initiatives and Advocacy office is specifically seeking your input on these comment opportunities.  Research, PN, NEP, DIFM, WM, WH, […]
Sleep is an essential component to maintaining health. In children, sleep is also vital for growth and development. Ongoing sleep deprivation has been linked to an increased risk for some chronic health problems. In addition, sleep deprivation has been shown to correlate with both increased susceptibility to illness and slower recovery times from illness.[46] In one study, people with chronic insufficient sleep, set as six hours of sleep a night or less, were found to be four times more likely to catch a cold compared to those who reported sleeping for seven hours or more a night.[47] Due to the role of sleep in regulating metabolism, insufficient sleep may also play a role in weight gain or, conversely, in impeding weight loss.[48] Additionally, in 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, which is the cancer research agency for the World Health Organization, declared that "shiftwork that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans," speaking to the dangers of long-term nighttime work due to its intrusion on sleep.[49] In 2015, the National Sleep Foundation released updated recommendations for sleep duration requirements based on age and concluded that "Individuals who habitually sleep outside the normal range may be exhibiting signs or symptoms of serious health problems or, if done volitionally, may be compromising their health and well-being."[50]
Just as there was a shift from viewing disease as a state to thinking of it as a process, the same shift happened in definitions of health. Again, the WHO played a leading role when it fostered the development of the health promotion movement in the 1980s. This brought in a new conception of health, not as a state, but in dynamic terms of resiliency, in other words, as "a resource for living". 1984 WHO revised the definition of health defined it as "the extent to which an individual or group is able to realize aspirations and satisfy needs and to change or cope with the environment. Health is a resource for everyday life, not the objective of living; it is a positive concept, emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities".[10] Thus, health referred to the ability to maintain homeostasis and recover from insults. Mental, intellectual, emotional and social health referred to a person's ability to handle stress, to acquire skills, to maintain relationships, all of which form resources for resiliency and independent living.[9] This opens up many possibilities for health to be taught, strengthened and learned.
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