The Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care (JWHIC) promotes latest research that makes a significant contribution in advancing knowledge on the prevention, diagnosis and management of issues related to women in global context. Journal of Women’s health includes a wide range of fields in its discipline like Obstetrics/Gynecology, Sex-Based Biology, Women: Postmenopausal Health, Women: Mental Health, Pregnancy and Reproductive Health, Gynecology Oncology, Child Birth, Autoimmune Disorders, Psychological Disorders, Women Care, Internal Medicine & Women Issues, Endocrinology.
We want to be your first source for rehabilitation, physical therapy, chiropractic, exercise, and other products that promote health and wellness. We work hard to keep as large an inventory of healthcare products in stock as possible so that our customers can benefit from fast and reliable customer service. Please browse the thousands of products in our online catalog. If you need help finding something, please ask us.
Above all, we want our clients to feel known and seen and valued. We bridge evidenced based knowledge with a Health At Every Size and Intuitive Eating approach to help our clients experience lasting physical healing from a variety of health conditions as well as healing of their whole self - because health goes far beyond the surface. We blend the heavy, emotional work with lighthearted laughter - of course this work is serious, but we also want it to be enjoyable and celebratory for our clients too! At RLWH, we strongly believe that it is never too late. There is hope for recovery and healing for anyone at anytime. 

The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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