Crystal’s interest in the Health At Every Size philosophy framework and the field disordered eating and eating disorders itself was sparked by both the FoodPsych podcast and the work of Marci Evans. Crystal's goal is to help each of her clients embrace flexible eating so they can live their fullest life. She specializes in nutrition for disordered eating and eating disorders, chronic dieting, and digestive, mental, and women’s health. In her work, Crystal bridges both psychology and nutrition in her approach to counseling, which allows her to provide effective therapeutic treatment. Her care is tailored to each client's unique needs utilizing a weight inclusive and compassionate practice that empowers the individual by focusing on sustainable behaviors for a healthy mind, body, and soul. Read more...
4. Infertility affects about 6% of married women ages 15-44 years in the U.S. Also, about 12% of women 15 – 44 years of age in the U.S. have difficulty getting pregnant or carrying a pregnancy to term, regardless of marital status. Infertility is defined as not being able to get pregnant after one year of unprotected sex. Several things increase a woman’s risk of infertility, including age, smoking, excessive alcohol use, extreme weight gain or loss, some untreated sexually transmitted diseases, or excessive physical or emotional stress that results in the absence of a menstrual period.
Here at Real Life Women's Health we approach each woman as a whole person with unique, individual needs. Building a strong, trusting and understanding relationship with each client is foundational to our work. We deeply believe that women don't need more information on how to be "healthy" or another protocol to follow. Rather we believe you have all the wisdom you need right inside you. Instead of telling people what to do, we come alongside our clients by educating, empowering and helping them to create space for listening so they can tap into that inner wisdom and internal body cues as a means to lasting, long term health and wellbeing - physically, mentally and emotionally. Whether you're recovering from an eating disorder or facing a health issue, you are the expert of your body. 
Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are sold directly to consumers without a prescription. There are approximately 800 OTC active ingredients available today that constitute more than 300,000 OTC medicines in the healthcare marketplace. They are sold in more than 750,000 retail outlets including pharmacies, grocery stores, convenience stores, mass merchandise retailers, etc. Like prescription drugs, OTC medicines are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and are safe and effective when used as directed. The Drug Facts label instructs consumers on how to properly choose and use them. OTCs treat many common ailments including pain, fever, cough and cold, upset stomach, and allergies.

We offer one-on-one and group sessions to clients locally in Boston and also anywhere with telehealth. The majority of our clients are at a distance, so we meet via video using a secure online platform. After filling out the form below, you can expect a reply within 48 hours (M-F) from our administrative staff with more information including appointment availability, scheduling, insurance information and paperwork to fill out before your first visit. We look forward to working with you!

I subscribed to this magazine thinking it would be about health, fitness, and above all, working out. The headlines on the cover seemed to suggest that was true, with the biggest fonts advertising things like "flat abs now" and "maximize your workout". In reality, the content of the magazine is mostly beauty (how that counts as "health" is beyond me) and weight-loss. Oh, the endless, endless articles about "burn more fat!" "three new foods that will help you burn fat!" "drop pounds with this easy exercise!" I don't need to lose weight and I found that these articles just played into my growing impression, as issue after issue dropped on my doormat, that the magazine views women as vapid, stereotypical beings whose only desire is to look good, whether through exercise (almost inevitably restricted to cardio and yoga), the "right" work-out clothes (really?) or knowing what dress is in fashion or what color make-up to buy. If you enjoy that sort of thing, that's fine- it is essentially one step above Cosmopolitan on the seriousness scale. If you're looking for actual information about working out and building muscle, know that Women's Health magazine is barely aware that these things exist, and when it does, it will come wrapped in the form of "ten minutes a day to tone your bum like a super-model!" or something equally cringe-inducing.


Prolonged psychological stress may negatively impact health, and has been cited as a factor in cognitive impairment with aging, depressive illness, and expression of disease.[59] Stress management is the application of methods to either reduce stress or increase tolerance to stress. Relaxation techniques are physical methods used to relieve stress. Psychological methods include cognitive therapy, meditation, and positive thinking, which work by reducing response to stress. Improving relevant skills, such as problem solving and time management skills, reduces uncertainty and builds confidence, which also reduces the reaction to stress-causing situations where those skills are applicable.

Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders in which the immune system attacks the body and destroys or alters tissues. There are more than 80 serious chronic illnesses in this category, including lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. According to the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA), about 75% of autoimmune diseases occur in women. By themselves, each disease appears to be uncommon except for diabetes, thyroid disease, and lupus but as a group, the disorders make up the fourth-largest cause of disability among American women.
Jump up ^ World Health Organization.Constitution of the World Health Organization as adopted by the International Health Conference, New York, 19–22 June 1946; signed on 22 July 1946 by the representatives of 61 States (Official Records of the World Health Organization, no. 2, p. 100) and entered into force on 7 April 1948. In Grad, Frank P. (2002). "The Preamble of the Constitution of the World Health Organization". Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 80 (12): 982.
Did you know that half of pregnancies in the U.S. are not planned? And did you know that planned pregnancies are better for mothers' and infants' health? That's why the U.S. Office of Population Affairs and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released formal recommendations on family planning services. I spoke with Susan B. Moskosky, acting director of the Office of Population Affairs, to learn more about quality family planning and why it matters.
After skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosis among American men, reports the American Cancer Society. If you have trouble urinating, develop pain when you urinate, or notice blood in your urine, it may be a sign of prostate problems. Make an appointment with your doctor. They may encourage you to get blood tests or undergo a prostate exam to check for prostate cancer or other conditions.
Most people can get the vitamins and minerals needed for optimum health by eating a well-balanced diet. It’s important to eat wide variety of vitamin- and mineral-rich foods, such as fresh fruits, veggies, and whole grains. Many of those foods also provide heart-healthy fiber and natural antioxidant compounds that can help lower your risk of certain diseases.
Health, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), is "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."[1][2] This definition has been subject to controversy, as it may have limited value for implementation.[3][4][5] Health may be defined as the ability to adapt and manage physical, mental and social challenges throughout life.[6]
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