We believe in an weight neutral, non diet, body positive approach that focuses on changing behaviors to promote lifelong health and wellbeing. We believe that true health does not include micromanaging your body size, controlling food or living by a set of rules. And health surely and is not defined by numbers. Rather, we believe true health means eating, moving and caring for yourself in a way that supports your body's physical, mental and emotional needs. Physical healing must address all aspects of health, not just what you eat and how you exercise. We believe that in order to experience optimal physical health and especially hormonal health, you have to consider and care for your emotional and mental health. Peace with food and your body is the gateway to living a healthful, purposeful, and meaningful life aligned with your values.
In the first decade of the 21st century, the conceptualization of health as an ability opened the door for self-assessments to become the main indicators to judge the performance of efforts aimed at improving human health[16]. It also created the opportunity for every person to feel healthy, even in the presence of multiple chronic diseases, or a terminal condition, and for the re-examination of determinants of health, away from the traditional approach that focuses on the reduction of the prevalence of diseases[17].
Health psychology, developed in the late 1970s, is its own domain of inquiry. Also called a medical psychologist, the health psychologist helps individuals explore the link between emotions and physical health. The health psychologist also helps physicians and medical professionals understand the emotional effects of a patient’s illness or disease. They practice in the areas of chronic pain management, oncology, physical rehabilitation, addiction treatment, eating disorders, and others. This professional can be found in clinics, hospitals, private practice, and public health agencies. Some also work in corporate settings to promote health and wellness among employees, engaging in workplace policies and decision-making.
Health, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), is "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."[1][2] This definition has been subject to controversy, as it may have limited value for implementation.[3][4][5] Health may be defined as the ability to adapt and manage physical, mental and social challenges throughout life.[6]
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