Maternal health refers to the health of women during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period. While motherhood is often a positive and fulfilling experience, for too many women it is associated with suffering, ill-health and even death. The major direct causes of maternal morbidity and mortality include haemorrhage, infection, high blood pressure, unsafe abortion, and obstructed labour.

Her own health journey with disordered eating, amenorrhea and hypothyroidism has been the catalyst to her career focused on women's health and eating disorders. As both a Board Certified Family Nurse Practitioner and Registered Dietitian, Robyn specializes in helping women heal from hormone & reproductive health issues and recover from eating disorders and disordered eating.
Public health has been described as "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals."[51] It is concerned with threats to the overall health of a community based on population health analysis. The population in question can be as small as a handful of people or as large as all the inhabitants of several continents (for instance, in the case of a pandemic). Public health has many sub-fields, but typically includes the interdisciplinary categories of epidemiology, biostatistics and health services. Environmental health, community health, behavioral health, and occupational health are also important areas of public health.
Dr. Bubbs is a busy father of three, Naturopathic Doctor and the Sports Nutrition lead for the Canadian men’s national basketball team. He’s also a published author and a popular podcast host. Sick, tired and constantly lacking energy during University, Dr. Bubbs first was introduced to Organika through its Ginseng Products. After feeling the benefits of natural health, Dr. Bubbs has made it his life’s mission to upgrade health naturally for better performance at work, the playing field, and at home.
By clicking on the link, you will be leaving the official Royal Philips Healthcare ("Philips") website. Any links to third-party websites that may appear on this site are provided only for your convenience and in no way represent any affiliation or endorsement of the information provided on those linked websites. Philips makes no representations or warranties of any kind with regard to any third-party websites or the information contained therein.
The Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care (JWHIC) promotes latest research that makes a significant contribution in advancing knowledge on the prevention, diagnosis and management of issues related to women in global context. Journal of Women’s health includes a wide range of fields in its discipline like Obstetrics/Gynecology, Sex-Based Biology, Women: Postmenopausal Health, Women: Mental Health, Pregnancy and Reproductive Health, Gynecology Oncology, Child Birth, Autoimmune Disorders, Psychological Disorders, Women Care, Internal Medicine & Women Issues, Endocrinology.
Natural health care products are currently regulated under the Natural Health Product Regulations, under the authority of the Food and Drugs Act.[3] The regulations address the sale of natural health products, manufacture, packaging, labelling and importation for sale of natural health products, the distribution of natural health products, and the storage of natural health products.[4] Under the regulations, all natural health products require a Natural Product Number (NPN), analogous to the Drug Identification Numbers (DINs) used to identify and monitor drugs in Canada.
Natural health care products are currently regulated under the Natural Health Product Regulations, under the authority of the Food and Drugs Act.[3] The regulations address the sale of natural health products, manufacture, packaging, labelling and importation for sale of natural health products, the distribution of natural health products, and the storage of natural health products.[4] Under the regulations, all natural health products require a Natural Product Number (NPN), analogous to the Drug Identification Numbers (DINs) used to identify and monitor drugs in Canada.
No matter what your health care goals or what wellness products you’re looking for, we’ll make the shopping process easy and convenient. Our Customer Service Representatives are ready to help you find just what you need, via telephone, mail, fax, email or even online live chat. When you’re ready to order, use our catalog quick shop or search DrLeonards.com to find products to meet your individual needs. You can also choose to shop from our Virtual Catalog to bring the catalog shopping experience to your computer, page by page. No matter how you prefer to shop Dr. Leonard’s, your satisfaction is our top priority. If for any reason you are not 100% satisfied with any product you purchase from us, you may return it for a prompt refund.

Every issue includes a section devoted to sex and relationships, giving you the answers to questions you might not want to ask your friends. From communicating with your significant other to showing a new woman you are interested, the magazine covers your relationship and dating questions. The magazine even includes a special section where a female reporter answers questions from a woman's perspective. Men's Health magazine also looks at the top trends in men's fashion, healthy choices at your favorite fast food restaurants, and the activities and exercises that professional athletes use to stay in shape.
6. Sex Trafficking is a serious public health problem that affects the well-being of individuals, families, and communities. The majority of victims are women and girls. Sex trafficking is defined as “the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for the purpose of a commercial sex act” by the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000. [393 KB]
The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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