From the first day I met you, I knew I had been introduced not only to a product that would completely revamp and change my life, but to a friend as well, who GENUINELY cares about the health of absolutely everyone in the world, from kids, adults, professional athletes & more. Your Core Health Products have done more for me than working out or eating right alone.
This site is governed solely by applicable U.S. laws and governmental regulations. Please see our Privacy Policy. Use of this site constitutes your consent to application of such laws and regulations and to our Privacy Policy. Your use of the information on this site is subject to the terms of our Legal Notice. You should view the News section and the most recent SEC Filings in the Investor section in order to receive the most current information made available by Johnson & Johnson Services, Inc. Contact Us with any questions or search this site for more information.
Genetics, or inherited traits from parents, also play a role in determining the health status of individuals and populations. This can encompass both the predisposition to certain diseases and health conditions, as well as the habits and behaviors individuals develop through the lifestyle of their families. For example, genetics may play a role in the manner in which people cope with stress, either mental, emotional or physical. For example, obesity is a significant problem in the United States that contributes to bad mental health and causes stress in the lives of great numbers of people[32]. (One difficulty is the issue raised by the debate over the relative strengths of genetics and other factors; interactions between genetics and environment may be of particular importance.)

The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
×