Did you know that half of pregnancies in the U.S. are not planned? And did you know that planned pregnancies are better for mothers' and infants' health? That's why the U.S. Office of Population Affairs and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released formal recommendations on family planning services. I spoke with Susan B. Moskosky, acting director of the Office of Population Affairs, to learn more about quality family planning and why it matters.
Did you know that half of pregnancies in the U.S. are not planned? And did you know that planned pregnancies are better for mothers' and infants' health? That's why the U.S. Office of Population Affairs and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released formal recommendations on family planning services. I spoke with Susan B. Moskosky, acting director of the Office of Population Affairs, to learn more about quality family planning and why it matters.
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The Health app keeps you motivated by showing you how much you move. It combines activity data from iPhone — like your steps and distance traveled — with metrics from third-party fitness apps. And Apple Watch automatically records simple but meaningful kinds of movement, like how often you stand, how much you exercise, and your all-day calorie burn.
Crystal’s interest in the Health At Every Size philosophy framework and the field disordered eating and eating disorders itself was sparked by both the FoodPsych podcast and the work of Marci Evans. Crystal's goal is to help each of her clients embrace flexible eating so they can live their fullest life. She specializes in nutrition for disordered eating and eating disorders, chronic dieting, and digestive, mental, and women’s health. In her work, Crystal bridges both psychology and nutrition in her approach to counseling, which allows her to provide effective therapeutic treatment. Her care is tailored to each client's unique needs utilizing a weight inclusive and compassionate practice that empowers the individual by focusing on sustainable behaviors for a healthy mind, body, and soul. Read more...
Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders in which the immune system attacks the body and destroys or alters tissues. There are more than 80 serious chronic illnesses in this category, including lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. According to the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA), about 75% of autoimmune diseases occur in women. By themselves, each disease appears to be uncommon except for diabetes, thyroid disease, and lupus but as a group, the disorders make up the fourth-largest cause of disability among American women.
There are also health conditions that only affect men, such as prostate cancer and low testosterone. Many of the major health risks that men face - like colon cancer or heart disease - can be prevented and treated with early diagnosis. Screening tests can find diseases early, when they are easier to treat. It's important to get the screening tests you need.
When you look around society today, you realize that obesity has become a major epidemic. As a result, we have developed numerous things to address this phenomena with more diet pills, weight loss programs, different ways to workout, intestinal surgeries, and the list goes on and on. To be fair, lots of these options work, however, some are harmful to the body like diet pills, but overall, people do lose the weight they want and are happy with the results.

The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]

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