My wife, son and I have been on the Wellness Program and since we have been taking core health our energy is amazing.  My son notices a difference when he does not take it and we have not gotten sick this winter which is usually inevitable. I know by taking a whole food supplement it has built our immune system to fight the common colds and flu.  My family and I love the product and are grateful for what it has done for our health.
I started taking the Digestive Enzymes and the Heart Health after attending your seminar at a meeting in San Antonio, Texas. My acid reflux was so bad that if I took a drink of just water without my medicine first, I would get acid reflux, not good. After my first week on core products I started backing off of my medicine and now as of this letter I have been off the medicine. That is all the time it took to stop the acid reflux. I am so happy that I came to your seminar and I share information about this product with everyone I know.
Smoking is one of the worst things you can do for your health. Secondhand smoke is also very dangerous. Nearly 7,300 nonsmoking Americans die from lung cancer caused by secondhand smoke every year, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Smoking and secondhand smoke exposure can also cause other health conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema, and heart disease. They also raise your risk of developing many types of cancer.
The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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