I am in the Army at Fort Benning.  I had trouble with my knees and the doctors were contemplating surgery.  My mom sent me some Joint Health and told me to take 4 a day.  Shortly after I shared with my mom that the Joint Health has helped me with my knees and I am able to run better and I have so much more energy.  I cannot imagine not having my JOINT HEALTH.  Thank you to my mom for sharing and Core Health for providing the best!!!
We offer one-on-one and group sessions to clients locally in Boston and also anywhere with telehealth. The majority of our clients are at a distance, so we meet via video using a secure online platform. After filling out the form below, you can expect a reply within 48 hours (M-F) from our administrative staff with more information including appointment availability, scheduling, insurance information and paperwork to fill out before your first visit. We look forward to working with you!
Whether you’re counting carbs, calories, caffeine, or a host of other important nutritional metrics, the Health app makes it easier to manage your goals and watch exactly what you eat. Third-party apps can help you keep a closer eye on every meal, and since all the data is displayed in Health, you’ll always know if you’re getting the nourishment you need.
Most people can get the vitamins and minerals needed for optimum health by eating a well-balanced diet. It’s important to eat wide variety of vitamin- and mineral-rich foods, such as fresh fruits, veggies, and whole grains. Many of those foods also provide heart-healthy fiber and natural antioxidant compounds that can help lower your risk of certain diseases.
The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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