We provide news, commentary, articles, links and information about events, services, resources and newsletters covering a wide range of topics and issues of relevance to men and boys from newspapers, magazines, websites, books, journals, practitioners and institutions. Our mythbusters section critiques inaccurate, biased and stereotypical reports about men, boys and gender issues, and encourages factual reporting in stories concerning males.

About 4 months ago I started working out and my friend shared with me what had helped her lose a bit of weight and thanks to incorporating the Digestive Health with my protein shakes and the Heart Health for fat loss I have lost 15lbs since starting on Core Health Products.  I love it and I notice a difference when I take my Heart Health.  I can tell when I don’t take it.  I guess if it’s good enough for the Pro’s then it’s good enough for me!!!

The Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) is the 137-year-old national trade association representing the leading manufacturers and marketers of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines and dietary supplements. Every dollar spent by consumers on OTC medicines saves the U.S. healthcare system $6-$7, contributing a total of $102 billion in savings each year. CHPA is committed to empowering consumer self-care by preserving and expanding choice and availability of consumer healthcare products.


The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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