Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, reports the National Cancer Institute. It’s important to begin screening for colorectal cancer starting around age 50. Your doctor can use a colonoscopy to check for cancerous growths in your colon. They will also check for polyps, a type of noncancerous growth. Certain types of polyps can develop into cancer at a later time. Ask your doctor how often you should have a colonoscopy conducted.
Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care is a peer-reviewed, international, indexed hybrid journal which offers dual mode of publication, open access & subscription. This mode provides the means to maximize the visibility, citations and readership which enhance the impact of the research work and provides a range of options to purchase our articles and also permits unlimited Internet Access to complete Journal content. It accepts research, review papers, online letters to the editors & brief comments on previously published articles or other relevant findings in SciTechnol. Articles submitted by authors are evaluated by a group of peer review experts in the field and ensures that the published articles are of high quality, reflect solid scholarship in their fields, and that the information they contain is accurate and reliable.
The Health app highlights four categories: Activity, Sleep, Mindfulness, and Nutrition. Each plays an important role in your overall health — and in the app. Health suggests great apps from each category to get you going, and the Today view shows all your stats at a glance to help you stay on track. Once you start using the Health app, there’s no stopping you.

Her own health journey with disordered eating, amenorrhea and hypothyroidism has been the catalyst to her career focused on women's health and eating disorders. As both a Board Certified Family Nurse Practitioner and Registered Dietitian, Robyn specializes in helping women heal from hormone & reproductive health issues and recover from eating disorders and disordered eating.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are sold directly to consumers without a prescription. There are approximately 800 OTC active ingredients available today that constitute more than 300,000 OTC medicines in the healthcare marketplace. They are sold in more than 750,000 retail outlets including pharmacies, grocery stores, convenience stores, mass merchandise retailers, etc. Like prescription drugs, OTC medicines are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and are safe and effective when used as directed. The Drug Facts label instructs consumers on how to properly choose and use them. OTCs treat many common ailments including pain, fever, cough and cold, upset stomach, and allergies.
The Health app highlights four categories: Activity, Sleep, Mindfulness, and Nutrition. Each plays an important role in your overall health — and in the app. Health suggests great apps from each category to get you going, and the Today view shows all your stats at a glance to help you stay on track. Once you start using the Health app, there’s no stopping you.

If you are over the age of 50 (heck - even 40 and possibly 30) then this is not the magazine for you. Show me real female athletes of all ages and include more serious articles on women's issues. The final straw was seeing a Kardashian on the cover. No thanks. I felt like this was Cosmopolitan magazine and Entertainment Tonight wrapped in spandex. Going back to Runner's World and Prevention.
Schedule yearly checkups with your doctor and keep these appointments. Your doctor can help monitor your weight, blood pressure, and the level of cholesterol in your blood. Excess weight, high blood pressure, and high blood cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Your doctor can recommend lifestyle changes, medications, or other treatments to help get your weight, blood pressure, and blood cholesterol under control.

I subscribed to this magazine thinking it would be about health, fitness, and above all, working out. The headlines on the cover seemed to suggest that was true, with the biggest fonts advertising things like "flat abs now" and "maximize your workout". In reality, the content of the magazine is mostly beauty (how that counts as "health" is beyond me) and weight-loss. Oh, the endless, endless articles about "burn more fat!" "three new foods that will help you burn fat!" "drop pounds with this easy exercise!" I don't need to lose weight and I found that these articles just played into my growing impression, as issue after issue dropped on my doormat, that the magazine views women as vapid, stereotypical beings whose only desire is to look good, whether through exercise (almost inevitably restricted to cardio and yoga), the "right" work-out clothes (really?) or knowing what dress is in fashion or what color make-up to buy. If you enjoy that sort of thing, that's fine- it is essentially one step above Cosmopolitan on the seriousness scale. If you're looking for actual information about working out and building muscle, know that Women's Health magazine is barely aware that these things exist, and when it does, it will come wrapped in the form of "ten minutes a day to tone your bum like a super-model!" or something equally cringe-inducing.
We provide news, commentary, articles, links and information about events, services, resources and newsletters covering a wide range of topics and issues of relevance to men and boys from newspapers, magazines, websites, books, journals, practitioners and institutions. Our mythbusters section critiques inaccurate, biased and stereotypical reports about men, boys and gender issues, and encourages factual reporting in stories concerning males.

Health Tools Baby Due Date CalculatorBasal Metabolic Rate CalculatorBody Mass Index (BMI) CalculatorCalories Burned CalculatorChild Energy Requirements CalculatorDaily Calcium Requirements CalculatorDaily Fibre Requirements CalculatorIdeal Weight CalculatorInfectious Diseases Exclusion Periods ToolOvulation CalculatorSmoking Cost CalculatorTarget Heart Rate CalculatorWaist-to-hip Ratio Calculator Risk Tests Depression Self-AssessmentErectile Dysfunction ToolMacular Degeneration ToolOsteoporosis Risk TestProstate Symptoms Self-Assessment
Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders in which the immune system attacks the body and destroys or alters tissues. There are more than 80 serious chronic illnesses in this category, including lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. According to the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA), about 75% of autoimmune diseases occur in women. By themselves, each disease appears to be uncommon except for diabetes, thyroid disease, and lupus but as a group, the disorders make up the fourth-largest cause of disability among American women.
The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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