Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care is a peer-reviewed, international, indexed hybrid journal which offers dual mode of publication, open access & subscription. This mode provides the means to maximize the visibility, citations and readership which enhance the impact of the research work and provides a range of options to purchase our articles and also permits unlimited Internet Access to complete Journal content. It accepts research, review papers, online letters to the editors & brief comments on previously published articles or other relevant findings in SciTechnol. Articles submitted by authors are evaluated by a group of peer review experts in the field and ensures that the published articles are of high quality, reflect solid scholarship in their fields, and that the information they contain is accurate and reliable.
Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, reports the National Cancer Institute. It’s important to begin screening for colorectal cancer starting around age 50. Your doctor can use a colonoscopy to check for cancerous growths in your colon. They will also check for polyps, a type of noncancerous growth. Certain types of polyps can develop into cancer at a later time. Ask your doctor how often you should have a colonoscopy conducted.
Women's Health Specialists is dedicated to providing women with information so that they can make the most informed decisions about their health care. WHS Health Alerts and News gives women the tools to better understand important health issues by demystifying health news. WHS Health Alerts is a place for women to read, discuss, and share news and their experiences.

Across 15 locations—from Portland’s four westside and three eastside offices, to our clinics in Gresham, Happy Valley, Hillsboro, Newberg, Oregon City and Tualatin—we’re a team of more than 120 physicians, certified nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners and genetic counselors committed to giving you the best care and support possible. We’re here for you--now with Portland's first out-of-hospital, natural birth center integrated with an OB/GYN specialty practice. 


Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, reports the National Cancer Institute. It’s important to begin screening for colorectal cancer starting around age 50. Your doctor can use a colonoscopy to check for cancerous growths in your colon. They will also check for polyps, a type of noncancerous growth. Certain types of polyps can develop into cancer at a later time. Ask your doctor how often you should have a colonoscopy conducted.

The Health app keeps you motivated by showing you how much you move. It combines activity data from iPhone — like your steps and distance traveled — with metrics from third-party fitness apps. And Apple Watch automatically records simple but meaningful kinds of movement, like how often you stand, how much you exercise, and your all-day calorie burn.


Copyright © 2007-2015, Men's Health Australia. All rights reserved. Articles, essays, media excerpts, links, references and other materials appearing on this website are included to encourage the widest possible intelligent consideration and debate of issues related to the health and well being of men and boys. They may not at all represent the views or opinions of Men's Health Australia or the collaborating organisation(s) sponsoring this website.
The great positive impact of public health programs is widely acknowledged. Due in part to the policies and actions developed through public health, the 20th century registered a decrease in the mortality rates for infants and children and a continual increase in life expectancy in most parts of the world. For example, it is estimated that life expectancy has increased for Americans by thirty years since 1900,[54] and worldwide by six years since 1990.[55]
Here at Real Life Women's Health we approach each woman as a whole person with unique, individual needs. Building a strong, trusting and understanding relationship with each client is foundational to our work. We deeply believe that women don't need more information on how to be "healthy" or another protocol to follow. Rather we believe you have all the wisdom you need right inside you. Instead of telling people what to do, we come alongside our clients by educating, empowering and helping them to create space for listening so they can tap into that inner wisdom and internal body cues as a means to lasting, long term health and wellbeing - physically, mentally and emotionally. Whether you're recovering from an eating disorder or facing a health issue, you are the expert of your body. 
Men's Health is an essential read for guys who want to look better, feel better, and live better. But Men's Health isn't just a magazine. It's the solution-for every bit of chaos, confusion, or suffering that the world can inflict on the male of the species. Belly fat. Fatheaded bosses. Exercise plateaus. Exercise excuses. Her boredom. His boredom. The fast-food menu. The wine list. We give men the tools, strategies, and motivation to handle all of this and more.
Copyright © 2007-2015, Men's Health Australia. All rights reserved. Articles, essays, media excerpts, links, references and other materials appearing on this website are included to encourage the widest possible intelligent consideration and debate of issues related to the health and well being of men and boys. They may not at all represent the views or opinions of Men's Health Australia or the collaborating organisation(s) sponsoring this website.
Once you've placed an order at Amazon.com, it can take one to two weeks for your subscription to be received and scheduled by the publisher. Your subscription is then added to the publisher's next production cycle and shipped via standard mail. For example, if your monthly subscription was ordered and received by the publisher in November, and the December issue has already shipped, your order may be added to the January mailing. You can find out more information, including how to contact the publisher about your subscription, in Amazon's Magazine Subscription Manager.
Men's Health magazine isn't for couch potatoes, but it can help those who prefer staying indoors lead a better life. The workout poster included inside every issue pulls out, letting you hang it in your home or office to keep an eye out for simple things you can do every day to stay healthy. The poster reminds you that you need the proper amount of sleep, the right combination of healthy foods, and the perfect amount of exercise to improve your overall health.

An increasing number of studies and reports from different organizations and contexts examine the linkages between health and different factors, including lifestyles, environments, health care organization and health policy, one specific health policy brought into many countries in recent years was the introduction of the sugar tax. Beverage taxes came into light with increasing concerns about obesity, particularly among youth. Sugar-sweetened beverages have become a target of anti-obesity initiatives with increasing evidence of their link to obesity.[22]– such as the 1974 Lalonde report from Canada;[21] the Alameda County Study in California;[23] and the series of World Health Reports of the World Health Organization, which focuses on global health issues including access to health care and improving public health outcomes, especially in developing countries.[24]
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