Because of the current competitive environment, health care providers (hospitals, HMOs, physicians, and others) are constantly searching for better products and better means for delivering them. The health care product is often loosely defined as a service. The authors develop a more precise definition of the health care product, product line, and product mix. A bundle-of-elements concept is presented for the health care product. These conceptualizations help to address how health care providers can segment their market and position, promote, and price their products. Though the authors focus on hospitals, the concepts and procedures developed are applicable to other health care organizations.
For more than 40 years, Windmill has been the trusted source for quality, innovative and efficacious vitamins and supplements. We offer hundreds of products in a variety of categories and delivery systems, so customers can feel confident to rely on us to support their overall wellbeing. Windmill products are available in multiple outlets nationwide. Learn more about what we can do for you.
The Cartwright Inquiry (1987 – 1988) was a watershed moment in patient rights, not only in New Zealand, but globally. The government ordered inquiry into unethical research practices related to the treatment of cervical cancer at National Women’s Hospital was instigated by Women’s Health Action (formerly Fertility Action) and was a major challenge to medical dominance at the time. Read more »
For more than 40 years, Windmill has been the trusted source for quality, innovative and efficacious vitamins and supplements. We offer hundreds of products in a variety of categories and delivery systems, so customers can feel confident to rely on us to support their overall wellbeing. Windmill products are available in multiple outlets nationwide. Learn more about what we can do for you.

Sleep is an essential component to maintaining health. In children, sleep is also vital for growth and development. Ongoing sleep deprivation has been linked to an increased risk for some chronic health problems. In addition, sleep deprivation has been shown to correlate with both increased susceptibility to illness and slower recovery times from illness.[46] In one study, people with chronic insufficient sleep, set as six hours of sleep a night or less, were found to be four times more likely to catch a cold compared to those who reported sleeping for seven hours or more a night.[47] Due to the role of sleep in regulating metabolism, insufficient sleep may also play a role in weight gain or, conversely, in impeding weight loss.[48] Additionally, in 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, which is the cancer research agency for the World Health Organization, declared that "shiftwork that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans," speaking to the dangers of long-term nighttime work due to its intrusion on sleep.[49] In 2015, the National Sleep Foundation released updated recommendations for sleep duration requirements based on age and concluded that "Individuals who habitually sleep outside the normal range may be exhibiting signs or symptoms of serious health problems or, if done volitionally, may be compromising their health and well-being."[50]


All WIC RDs: Please respond directly to Dawn Ballosingh, WH DPG Chair, at dballosingh@oneworldomaha.org to collate on behalf of the group or fill out the form and send it to Mark (mrifkin@eatright.org) directly. Deadline is November 2nd. The Policy Initiatives and Advocacy office is specifically seeking your input on these comment opportunities.  Research, PN, NEP, DIFM, WM, WH, […]
NHPs are safe to consume and generally have less side effects than traditional drug medications. However, NHP are not risk free and have potential for some risks. These may come about from manufacturing problems (contamination, incorrect dose), misrepresented or unproven claims on the label, unexpected side effects (allergic reaction), or interaction with other medication/NHPs also being consumed. It has been reported that 12% of Canadians have experienced unwanted side effects due to the consumption of NHPs. It is recommended that you do your research and consult a health care professional if you are concerned with the potential risks.[5]
With a unique combination of infection protection and contamination control products and services, STERIS Corporation offers customized solutions for a variety of environments. Rely on STERIS to help you gain productivity, lower costs, and protect staff and patients throughout your Operating Room, Sterile Processing Department, GI/Endoscopy Suite, and Ambulatory Surgery Center.
All WIC RDs: Please respond directly to Dawn Ballosingh, WH DPG Chair, at dballosingh@oneworldomaha.org to collate on behalf of the group or fill out the form and send it to Mark (mrifkin@eatright.org) directly. Deadline is November 2nd. The Policy Initiatives and Advocacy office is specifically seeking your input on these comment opportunities.  Research, PN, NEP, DIFM, WM, WH, […]
Finding a moment to take a few deep breaths and quiet your mind is a great way to relieve stress and improve your overall health. That’s what mindfulness is all about. The Breathe app on Apple Watch and many other third-party experiences help you decompress and stay centered throughout your day. Whichever apps you choose, Health adds up the numbers to show you how much time you’ve spent being mindful.

Because of the current competitive environment, health care providers (hospitals, HMOs, physicians, and others) are constantly searching for better products and better means for delivering them. The health care product is often loosely defined as a service. The authors develop a more precise definition of the health care product, product line, and product mix. A bundle-of-elements concept is presented for the health care product. These conceptualizations help to address how health care providers can segment their market and position, promote, and price their products. Though the authors focus on hospitals, the concepts and procedures developed are applicable to other health care organizations.

I subscribed to this in MY early 20's way back in the magazines infancy. Back when the cover photo's were black and white and most of the cover "models" were female athletes. It's changed since then, catering a little more to the "Cosmo" crowd. Which is fine, just not for me. It just doesn't feel like it applies as much to someone in their thirties married with kids as someone in their twenties who apparently has the money and lack of self-control to spend $90 on a designer t-shirt (really).
I subscribed to this magazine thinking it would be about health, fitness, and above all, working out. The headlines on the cover seemed to suggest that was true, with the biggest fonts advertising things like "flat abs now" and "maximize your workout". In reality, the content of the magazine is mostly beauty (how that counts as "health" is beyond me) and weight-loss. Oh, the endless, endless articles about "burn more fat!" "three new foods that will help you burn fat!" "drop pounds with this easy exercise!" I don't need to lose weight and I found that these articles just played into my growing impression, as issue after issue dropped on my doormat, that the magazine views women as vapid, stereotypical beings whose only desire is to look good, whether through exercise (almost inevitably restricted to cardio and yoga), the "right" work-out clothes (really?) or knowing what dress is in fashion or what color make-up to buy. If you enjoy that sort of thing, that's fine- it is essentially one step above Cosmopolitan on the seriousness scale. If you're looking for actual information about working out and building muscle, know that Women's Health magazine is barely aware that these things exist, and when it does, it will come wrapped in the form of "ten minutes a day to tone your bum like a super-model!" or something equally cringe-inducing.

Health, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), is "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."[1][2] This definition has been subject to controversy, as it may have limited value for implementation.[3][4][5] Health may be defined as the ability to adapt and manage physical, mental and social challenges throughout life.[6]
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