Focusing more on lifestyle issues and their relationships with functional health, data from the Alameda County Study suggested that people can improve their health via exercise, enough sleep, maintaining a healthy body weight, limiting alcohol use, and avoiding smoking.[28] Health and illness can co-exist, as even people with multiple chronic diseases or terminal illnesses can consider themselves healthy.[29]

Did you know that half of pregnancies in the U.S. are not planned? And did you know that planned pregnancies are better for mothers' and infants' health? That's why the U.S. Office of Population Affairs and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently released formal recommendations on family planning services. I spoke with Susan B. Moskosky, acting director of the Office of Population Affairs, to learn more about quality family planning and why it matters.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month but did you realize all the pink products sold today actually contribute more to cancer? Statistics show that 50% of us will be diagnosed with cancer in our lifetime! So what you do today can either increase your changes of being diagnosed or decrease them. Watch as Shan breaks it down into simple preventive steps you can easily do to never hear the dreaded C word again.
The referenced committee has scheduled a meeting with remote access to be held Wednesday, November 7th. The meeting will be held November 7, 2018, 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. ET and November 8, 2018, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. ET in-person and by webinar and teleconference. The address for the meeting is DoubleTree by Hilton, Bethesda, 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland […]
Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders in which the immune system attacks the body and destroys or alters tissues. There are more than 80 serious chronic illnesses in this category, including lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. According to the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA), about 75% of autoimmune diseases occur in women. By themselves, each disease appears to be uncommon except for diabetes, thyroid disease, and lupus but as a group, the disorders make up the fourth-largest cause of disability among American women.
When you look around society today, you realize that obesity has become a major epidemic. As a result, we have developed numerous things to address this phenomena with more diet pills, weight loss programs, different ways to workout, intestinal surgeries, and the list goes on and on. To be fair, lots of these options work, however, some are harmful to the body like diet pills, but overall, people do lose the weight they want and are happy with the results.

Finding a moment to take a few deep breaths and quiet your mind is a great way to relieve stress and improve your overall health. That’s what mindfulness is all about. The Breathe app on Apple Watch and many other third-party experiences help you decompress and stay centered throughout your day. Whichever apps you choose, Health adds up the numbers to show you how much time you’ve spent being mindful.
The journal uses Editorial Manager System for a qualitative and prompt review process. Editorial Manager is an online manuscript submission, review and tracking system. Review processing is performed by the editorial board members of Journal of Women's Health, Issues & Care or relevant experts from other universities or institutes. Minimum two independent reviewer’s approval followed by editor approval is required for the acceptance of any citable manuscript. Authors may submit manuscripts and track their progress through the editorial system. Reviewers can download manuscripts and submit their opinions to the editor whereas the editors can manage the whole submission/review/revise/publish process via editorial manager.

The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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