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Organized interventions to improve health based on the principles and procedures developed through the health sciences are provided by practitioners trained in medicine, nursing, nutrition, pharmacy, social work, psychology, occupational therapy, physical therapy and other health care professions. Clinical practitioners focus mainly on the health of individuals, while public health practitioners consider the overall health of communities and populations. Workplace wellness programs are increasingly adopted by companies for their value in improving the health and well-being of their employees, as are school health services in order to improve the health and well-being of children.
A sexual problem is anything that interferes with a women's satisfaction with a sexual activity. A sexual problem, or sexual dysfunction, refers to a problem during any phase of the sexual response cycle that prevents the individual or couple from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual activity. The sexual response cycle has four phases: excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.
Liz’s personal values of connection, compassion, trust, presence, and joy have led her to dedicate her career to supporting women in living life true to their own unique values. Utilizing evidence based treatments such as Intuitive Eating and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Liz serves as therapist, coach, and educator for women on their journey to true self-compassion and nourishment. She believes that healing and growth happen through relationships that are compassionate, vulnerable, accepting, and respectful of each person’s unique story. Liz is incredibly grateful every day for the opportunity to witness women become empowered to trust themselves, to use their voice, and to live in alignment with their soul’s wisdom and light. Read more...
The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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