The effects of a women's diet on her children start long before she becomes pregnant. Storage of fat, protein, and other nutrients built up over the years are called upon during pregnancy for fetal nourishment. These kinds of food provide women with plenty of energy, the means for lifelong weight control, and the key ingredients for looking and feeling great at any age.
The great positive impact of public health programs is widely acknowledged. Due in part to the policies and actions developed through public health, the 20th century registered a decrease in the mortality rates for infants and children and a continual increase in life expectancy in most parts of the world. For example, it is estimated that life expectancy has increased for Americans by thirty years since 1900,[54] and worldwide by six years since 1990.[55]

The journal uses Editorial Manager System for a qualitative and prompt review process. Editorial Manager is an online manuscript submission, review and tracking system. Review processing is performed by the editorial board members of Journal of Women's Health, Issues & Care or relevant experts from other universities or institutes. Minimum two independent reviewer’s approval followed by editor approval is required for the acceptance of any citable manuscript. Authors may submit manuscripts and track their progress through the editorial system. Reviewers can download manuscripts and submit their opinions to the editor whereas the editors can manage the whole submission/review/revise/publish process via editorial manager.


The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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