Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, reports the National Cancer Institute. It’s important to begin screening for colorectal cancer starting around age 50. Your doctor can use a colonoscopy to check for cancerous growths in your colon. They will also check for polyps, a type of noncancerous growth. Certain types of polyps can develop into cancer at a later time. Ask your doctor how often you should have a colonoscopy conducted.
Ordering dental supplies is an easy task with DHPI. We provide an easy to use online store highlighting the best dental manufacturer supplies and promotions. Shopping for value could not be easier. We identify the best dental supply deals, promotions and exclusive offers from key industry manufacturers such as: 3M Oral Care, Dentsply Sirona, KaVo Kerr, Crosstex International, Ivoclar Vivadent, GC America, Hu Friedy, Septodont,Young Dental, Coltene, Premier® Dental, Sunstar Americas, Inc., Kulzer and more; with trusted brands like: CaviWipes, Aquasil, Crest, Filtek, Relyx, Luxatemp, Sonicfill, Lidocaine, Hygenic, and Midwest. DHPI also offers an extensive catalog of our own private label, Health-Tec® brand supplies. This catalog contains great value with low prices on: nitrile and latex gloves, earloop exam masks, saliva ejectors, sterilization pouches, impression materials, burs, cotton products, disposable prophy angles, prophy paste, fluoride varnish, and more. 
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month but did you realize all the pink products sold today actually contribute more to cancer? Statistics show that 50% of us will be diagnosed with cancer in our lifetime! So what you do today can either increase your changes of being diagnosed or decrease them. Watch as Shan breaks it down into simple preventive steps you can easily do to never hear the dreaded C word again.

The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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