Here at Real Life Women's Health we approach each woman as a whole person with unique, individual needs. Building a strong, trusting and understanding relationship with each client is foundational to our work. We deeply believe that women don't need more information on how to be "healthy" or another protocol to follow. Rather we believe you have all the wisdom you need right inside you. Instead of telling people what to do, we come alongside our clients by educating, empowering and helping them to create space for listening so they can tap into that inner wisdom and internal body cues as a means to lasting, long term health and wellbeing - physically, mentally and emotionally. Whether you're recovering from an eating disorder or facing a health issue, you are the expert of your body. 

Lifestyle choices are contributing factors to poor health in many cases. These include smoking cigarettes, and can also include a poor diet, whether it is overeating or an overly constrictive diet. Inactivity can also contribute to health issues and also a lack of sleep, excessive alcohol consumption, and neglect of oral hygiene (Moffett2013).There are also genetic disorders that are inherited by the person and can vary in how much they affect the person and when they surface (Moffett, 2013).
4. Infertility affects about 6% of married women ages 15-44 years in the U.S. Also, about 12% of women 15 – 44 years of age in the U.S. have difficulty getting pregnant or carrying a pregnancy to term, regardless of marital status. Infertility is defined as not being able to get pregnant after one year of unprotected sex. Several things increase a woman’s risk of infertility, including age, smoking, excessive alcohol use, extreme weight gain or loss, some untreated sexually transmitted diseases, or excessive physical or emotional stress that results in the absence of a menstrual period.
In addition to safety risks, many jobs also present risks of disease, illness and other long-term health problems. Among the most common occupational diseases are various forms of pneumoconiosis, including silicosis and coal worker's pneumoconiosis (black lung disease). Asthma is another respiratory illness that many workers are vulnerable to. Workers may also be vulnerable to skin diseases, including eczema, dermatitis, urticaria, sunburn, and skin cancer.[60][61] Other occupational diseases of concern include carpal tunnel syndrome and lead poisoning.
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Since the late 1970s, the federal Healthy People Initiative has been a visible component of the United States’ approach to improving population health.[11][12] In each decade, a new version of Healthy People is issued,[13] featuring updated goals and identifying topic areas and quantifiable objectives for health improvement during the succeeding ten years, with assessment at that point of progress or lack thereof. Progress has been limited to many objectives, leading to concerns about the effectiveness of Healthy People in shaping outcomes in the context of a decentralized and uncoordinated US health system. Healthy People 2020 gives more prominence to health promotion and preventive approaches and adds a substantive focus on the importance of addressing social determinants of health. A new expanded digital interface facilitates use and dissemination rather than bulky printed books as produced in the past. The impact of these changes to Healthy People will be determined in the coming years.[14]
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