Maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) is the branch of obstetrics which focuses mainly on the medical and surgical management of high-risk pregnancies that includes monitoring and treatment including comprehensive ultrasound, chorionic villus sampling, genetic amniocentesis, and fetal surgery or treatment. Obstetricians who practice maternal-fetal medicine are also known as perinatologists.
I subscribed to this magazine thinking it would be about health, fitness, and above all, working out. The headlines on the cover seemed to suggest that was true, with the biggest fonts advertising things like "flat abs now" and "maximize your workout". In reality, the content of the magazine is mostly beauty (how that counts as "health" is beyond me) and weight-loss. Oh, the endless, endless articles about "burn more fat!" "three new foods that will help you burn fat!" "drop pounds with this easy exercise!" I don't need to lose weight and I found that these articles just played into my growing impression, as issue after issue dropped on my doormat, that the magazine views women as vapid, stereotypical beings whose only desire is to look good, whether through exercise (almost inevitably restricted to cardio and yoga), the "right" work-out clothes (really?) or knowing what dress is in fashion or what color make-up to buy. If you enjoy that sort of thing, that's fine- it is essentially one step above Cosmopolitan on the seriousness scale. If you're looking for actual information about working out and building muscle, know that Women's Health magazine is barely aware that these things exist, and when it does, it will come wrapped in the form of "ten minutes a day to tone your bum like a super-model!" or something equally cringe-inducing.
If you are over the age of 50 (heck - even 40 and possibly 30) then this is not the magazine for you. Show me real female athletes of all ages and include more serious articles on women's issues. The final straw was seeing a Kardashian on the cover. No thanks. I felt like this was Cosmopolitan magazine and Entertainment Tonight wrapped in spandex. Going back to Runner's World and Prevention.

If you are over the age of 50 (heck - even 40 and possibly 30) then this is not the magazine for you. Show me real female athletes of all ages and include more serious articles on women's issues. The final straw was seeing a Kardashian on the cover. No thanks. I felt like this was Cosmopolitan magazine and Entertainment Tonight wrapped in spandex. Going back to Runner's World and Prevention.


Liz’s personal values of connection, compassion, trust, presence, and joy have led her to dedicate her career to supporting women in living life true to their own unique values. Utilizing evidence based treatments such as Intuitive Eating and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Liz serves as therapist, coach, and educator for women on their journey to true self-compassion and nourishment. She believes that healing and growth happen through relationships that are compassionate, vulnerable, accepting, and respectful of each person’s unique story. Liz is incredibly grateful every day for the opportunity to witness women become empowered to trust themselves, to use their voice, and to live in alignment with their soul’s wisdom and light. Read more...
At DuPont, the Science of Protection has evolved over two centuries.  We have put that science to work to develop a broad range of healthcare products and high-performance materials that are helping to advance better healthcare and improve the lives of people around the world. So whether you are looking for healthcare products that offer a better way to help protect against the spread of infection in healthcare facilities, need advanced materials to help in the development of an innovative medical device or want a medical fabric that helps keep healthcare professionals protected and comfortable in the operating room, look to DuPont. 
Maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) is the branch of obstetrics which focuses mainly on the medical and surgical management of high-risk pregnancies that includes monitoring and treatment including comprehensive ultrasound, chorionic villus sampling, genetic amniocentesis, and fetal surgery or treatment. Obstetricians who practice maternal-fetal medicine are also known as perinatologists.
The maintenance and promotion of health is achieved through different combination of physical, mental, and social well-being, together sometimes referred to as the "health triangle."[25][26] The WHO's 1986 Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion further stated that health is not just a state, but also "a resource for everyday life, not the objective of living. Health is a positive concept emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities."[27]
Health, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), is "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."[1][2] This definition has been subject to controversy, as it may have limited value for implementation.[3][4][5] Health may be defined as the ability to adapt and manage physical, mental and social challenges throughout life.[6]
×