The Cartwright Inquiry (1987 – 1988) was a watershed moment in patient rights, not only in New Zealand, but globally. The government ordered inquiry into unethical research practices related to the treatment of cervical cancer at National Women’s Hospital was instigated by Women’s Health Action (formerly Fertility Action) and was a major challenge to medical dominance at the time. Read more »
4. Infertility affects about 6% of married women ages 15-44 years in the U.S. Also, about 12% of women 15 – 44 years of age in the U.S. have difficulty getting pregnant or carrying a pregnancy to term, regardless of marital status. Infertility is defined as not being able to get pregnant after one year of unprotected sex. Several things increase a woman’s risk of infertility, including age, smoking, excessive alcohol use, extreme weight gain or loss, some untreated sexually transmitted diseases, or excessive physical or emotional stress that results in the absence of a menstrual period.
*Information on this site is provided for informational purposes and it is not meant to substitute the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. You should not use the information contained herein for diagnosing or treating a health problem or medication. If you have or suspect that you have a medical condition, promptly contact your health care provider. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
If you are over the age of 50 (heck - even 40 and possibly 30) then this is not the magazine for you. Show me real female athletes of all ages and include more serious articles on women's issues. The final straw was seeing a Kardashian on the cover. No thanks. I felt like this was Cosmopolitan magazine and Entertainment Tonight wrapped in spandex. Going back to Runner's World and Prevention.
Organized interventions to improve health based on the principles and procedures developed through the health sciences are provided by practitioners trained in medicine, nursing, nutrition, pharmacy, social work, psychology, occupational therapy, physical therapy and other health care professions. Clinical practitioners focus mainly on the health of individuals, while public health practitioners consider the overall health of communities and populations. Workplace wellness programs are increasingly adopted by companies for their value in improving the health and well-being of their employees, as are school health services in order to improve the health and well-being of children.
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We offer one-on-one and group sessions to clients locally in Boston and also anywhere with telehealth. The majority of our clients are at a distance, so we meet via video using a secure online platform. After filling out the form below, you can expect a reply within 48 hours (M-F) from our administrative staff with more information including appointment availability, scheduling, insurance information and paperwork to fill out before your first visit. We look forward to working with you!
Robyn's practice is rooted in a weight neutral, non diet approach where she helps women identify and tune out diet culture so they can instead turn into their body's inner wisdom and internal cues to discover true health and healing. Her approach centers around changing behaviors instead of numbers and empowering women to care for their whole self. Read more....
WH DPG Awards Coordinator, Ginger Carney, has gathered resources regarding the intention and initiation of breastfeeding among women who are incarcerated: Interesting article from the AAFP (American Academy of Family Practitioners): https://www.aafp.org/news/health-of-the-public/20170718incarceratedbreastfeed.html Interesting power point presentation from a WIC program in California making their case: http://californiabreastfeeding.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/CBC-Breastfeeding-in-the-Incarcerated-Mother.pdf From an AWHONN (annual meeting): https://awhonn.confex.com/awhonn/2013/webprogram/Paper9198.html From Michigan: https://www.mibreastfeeding.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Incarceration-MIBFN-Policy-Position.pdf […]
An increasing number of studies and reports from different organizations and contexts examine the linkages between health and different factors, including lifestyles, environments, health care organization and health policy, one specific health policy brought into many countries in recent years was the introduction of the sugar tax. Beverage taxes came into light with increasing concerns about obesity, particularly among youth. Sugar-sweetened beverages have become a target of anti-obesity initiatives with increasing evidence of their link to obesity.[22]– such as the 1974 Lalonde report from Canada;[21] the Alameda County Study in California;[23] and the series of World Health Reports of the World Health Organization, which focuses on global health issues including access to health care and improving public health outcomes, especially in developing countries.[24]
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