4. Infertility affects about 6% of married women ages 15-44 years in the U.S. Also, about 12% of women 15 – 44 years of age in the U.S. have difficulty getting pregnant or carrying a pregnancy to term, regardless of marital status. Infertility is defined as not being able to get pregnant after one year of unprotected sex. Several things increase a woman’s risk of infertility, including age, smoking, excessive alcohol use, extreme weight gain or loss, some untreated sexually transmitted diseases, or excessive physical or emotional stress that results in the absence of a menstrual period.
The focus of public health interventions is to prevent and manage diseases, injuries and other health conditions through surveillance of cases and the promotion of healthy behavior, communities, and (in aspects relevant to human health) environments. Its aim is to prevent health problems from happening or re-occurring by implementing educational programs, developing policies, administering services and conducting research.[52] In many cases, treating a disease or controlling a pathogen can be vital to preventing it in others, such as during an outbreak. Vaccination programs and distribution of condoms to prevent the spread of communicable diseases are examples of common preventive public health measures, as are educational campaigns to promote vaccination and the use of condoms (including overcoming resistance to such).
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month but did you realize all the pink products sold today actually contribute more to cancer? Statistics show that 50% of us will be diagnosed with cancer in our lifetime! So what you do today can either increase your changes of being diagnosed or decrease them. Watch as Shan breaks it down into simple preventive steps you can easily do to never hear the dreaded C word again.
Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, reports the National Cancer Institute. It’s important to begin screening for colorectal cancer starting around age 50. Your doctor can use a colonoscopy to check for cancerous growths in your colon. They will also check for polyps, a type of noncancerous growth. Certain types of polyps can develop into cancer at a later time. Ask your doctor how often you should have a colonoscopy conducted.
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At DuPont, the Science of Protection has evolved over two centuries.  We have put that science to work to develop a broad range of healthcare products and high-performance materials that are helping to advance better healthcare and improve the lives of people around the world. So whether you are looking for healthcare products that offer a better way to help protect against the spread of infection in healthcare facilities, need advanced materials to help in the development of an innovative medical device or want a medical fabric that helps keep healthcare professionals protected and comfortable in the operating room, look to DuPont. 
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Just as there was a shift from viewing disease as a state to thinking of it as a process, the same shift happened in definitions of health. Again, the WHO played a leading role when it fostered the development of the health promotion movement in the 1980s. This brought in a new conception of health, not as a state, but in dynamic terms of resiliency, in other words, as "a resource for living". 1984 WHO revised the definition of health defined it as "the extent to which an individual or group is able to realize aspirations and satisfy needs and to change or cope with the environment. Health is a resource for everyday life, not the objective of living; it is a positive concept, emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities".[10] Thus, health referred to the ability to maintain homeostasis and recover from insults. Mental, intellectual, emotional and social health referred to a person's ability to handle stress, to acquire skills, to maintain relationships, all of which form resources for resiliency and independent living.[9] This opens up many possibilities for health to be taught, strengthened and learned.
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