Crystal’s interest in the Health At Every Size philosophy framework and the field disordered eating and eating disorders itself was sparked by both the FoodPsych podcast and the work of Marci Evans. Crystal's goal is to help each of her clients embrace flexible eating so they can live their fullest life. She specializes in nutrition for disordered eating and eating disorders, chronic dieting, and digestive, mental, and women’s health. In her work, Crystal bridges both psychology and nutrition in her approach to counseling, which allows her to provide effective therapeutic treatment. Her care is tailored to each client's unique needs utilizing a weight inclusive and compassionate practice that empowers the individual by focusing on sustainable behaviors for a healthy mind, body, and soul. Read more...
The maintenance and promotion of health is achieved through different combination of physical, mental, and social well-being, together sometimes referred to as the "health triangle."[25][26] The WHO's 1986 Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion further stated that health is not just a state, but also "a resource for everyday life, not the objective of living. Health is a positive concept emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities."[27]
Liz’s personal values of connection, compassion, trust, presence, and joy have led her to dedicate her career to supporting women in living life true to their own unique values. Utilizing evidence based treatments such as Intuitive Eating and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Liz serves as therapist, coach, and educator for women on their journey to true self-compassion and nourishment. She believes that healing and growth happen through relationships that are compassionate, vulnerable, accepting, and respectful of each person’s unique story. Liz is incredibly grateful every day for the opportunity to witness women become empowered to trust themselves, to use their voice, and to live in alignment with their soul’s wisdom and light. Read more...

I am a college football player and last season got hurt.  I had surgery on my ACL and was given Joint Health right after surgery.  My doctors and I were shocked at how quickly I recovered just by taking the Joint Health.  My doctor said I was 2 months ahead of schedule and I recovered that much quicker just by using Joint Health.  I am now back on the field and feel amazing.  The other thing that shocked my doctor was that there was no scar tissue in the area which is typically unheard of.  Thanks Core Health.
Core Health Products uses only the best and most natural whole food ingredients along with organics when available. You will never find synthetics or fractionated nutrients. Each and every ingredient has been carefully selected to fulfill a specific need with the most bio available delivery system for proper utilization. Your body deserves the best nutrition it can get, and that is precisely what the Core Health Products deliver!
Health science is the branch of science focused on health. There are two main approaches to health science: the study and research of the body and health-related issues to understand how humans (and animals) function, and the application of that knowledge to improve health and to prevent and cure diseases and other physical and mental impairments. The science builds on many sub-fields, including biology, biochemistry, physics, epidemiology, pharmacology, medical sociology. Applied health sciences endeavor to better understand and improve human health through applications in areas such as health education, biomedical engineering, biotechnology and public health.

One reason erectile dysfunction becomes more common with age is that older men are more likely to be on some kind of medication. In fact, an estimated 25% of all ED is a side effect of drugs, according to the Harvard Special Health Report Erectile Dysfunction: How medication, lifestyle changes, and other therapies can help you conquer this vexing problem. The most common types of medication that are linked to ED include antidepressants, anti-ulcer drugs, tranquilizers, and diuretics—which help the body get rid of sodium and water, and are used to treat heart failure, liver failure, and certain kidney disorders. More »


Living a healthy life means making lifestyle choices that support your physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional well-being. Managing your health can be challenging at times; while one facet of your wellness demands more attention than others, you may end up struggling to maintain a good balance in other areas. To be of sound body, mind, and spirit, it’s important to pay attention to all aspects of health—your mental, emotional, and spiritual sides all play a role in your physical welfare, and vice versa. A state of optimal well-being means more than just the absence of disease or disorder; it also means having the resources to cope with problems and circumstances beyond your control and recover from difficult or troubling situations. This intersection between health and behavior can help you prevent illness, and steer you to make better decisions about your well-being.
For more than 40 years, Windmill has been the trusted source for quality, innovative and efficacious vitamins and supplements. We offer hundreds of products in a variety of categories and delivery systems, so customers can feel confident to rely on us to support their overall wellbeing. Windmill products are available in multiple outlets nationwide. Learn more about what we can do for you.
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The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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