The Health app highlights four categories: Activity, Sleep, Mindfulness, and Nutrition. Each plays an important role in your overall health — and in the app. Health suggests great apps from each category to get you going, and the Today view shows all your stats at a glance to help you stay on track. Once you start using the Health app, there’s no stopping you.
WH DPG Awards Coordinator, Ginger Carney, has gathered resources regarding the intention and initiation of breastfeeding among women who are incarcerated: Interesting article from the AAFP (American Academy of Family Practitioners): https://www.aafp.org/news/health-of-the-public/20170718incarceratedbreastfeed.html Interesting power point presentation from a WIC program in California making their case: http://californiabreastfeeding.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/CBC-Breastfeeding-in-the-Incarcerated-Mother.pdf From an AWHONN (annual meeting): https://awhonn.confex.com/awhonn/2013/webprogram/Paper9198.html From Michigan: https://www.mibreastfeeding.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Incarceration-MIBFN-Policy-Position.pdf […]
Since the late 1970s, the federal Healthy People Initiative has been a visible component of the United States’ approach to improving population health.[11][12] In each decade, a new version of Healthy People is issued,[13] featuring updated goals and identifying topic areas and quantifiable objectives for health improvement during the succeeding ten years, with assessment at that point of progress or lack thereof. Progress has been limited to many objectives, leading to concerns about the effectiveness of Healthy People in shaping outcomes in the context of a decentralized and uncoordinated US health system. Healthy People 2020 gives more prominence to health promotion and preventive approaches and adds a substantive focus on the importance of addressing social determinants of health. A new expanded digital interface facilitates use and dissemination rather than bulky printed books as produced in the past. The impact of these changes to Healthy People will be determined in the coming years.[14]

All WIC RDs: Please respond directly to Dawn Ballosingh, WH DPG Chair, at dballosingh@oneworldomaha.org to collate on behalf of the group or fill out the form and send it to Mark (mrifkin@eatright.org) directly. Deadline is November 2nd. The Policy Initiatives and Advocacy office is specifically seeking your input on these comment opportunities.  Research, PN, NEP, DIFM, WM, WH, […]
The great positive impact of public health programs is widely acknowledged. Due in part to the policies and actions developed through public health, the 20th century registered a decrease in the mortality rates for infants and children and a continual increase in life expectancy in most parts of the world. For example, it is estimated that life expectancy has increased for Americans by thirty years since 1900,[54] and worldwide by six years since 1990.[55]
Health Tools Baby Due Date CalculatorBasal Metabolic Rate CalculatorBody Mass Index (BMI) CalculatorCalories Burned CalculatorChild Energy Requirements CalculatorDaily Calcium Requirements CalculatorDaily Fibre Requirements CalculatorIdeal Weight CalculatorInfectious Diseases Exclusion Periods ToolOvulation CalculatorSmoking Cost CalculatorTarget Heart Rate CalculatorWaist-to-hip Ratio Calculator Risk Tests Depression Self-AssessmentErectile Dysfunction ToolMacular Degeneration ToolOsteoporosis Risk TestProstate Symptoms Self-Assessment

The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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