The Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care (JWHIC) promotes latest research that makes a significant contribution in advancing knowledge on the prevention, diagnosis and management of issues related to women in global context. Journal of Women’s health includes a wide range of fields in its discipline like Obstetrics/Gynecology, Sex-Based Biology, Women: Postmenopausal Health, Women: Mental Health, Pregnancy and Reproductive Health, Gynecology Oncology, Child Birth, Autoimmune Disorders, Psychological Disorders, Women Care, Internal Medicine & Women Issues, Endocrinology.
We provide news, commentary, articles, links and information about events, services, resources and newsletters covering a wide range of topics and issues of relevance to men and boys from newspapers, magazines, websites, books, journals, practitioners and institutions. Our mythbusters section critiques inaccurate, biased and stereotypical reports about men, boys and gender issues, and encourages factual reporting in stories concerning males.
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In the first decade of the 21st century, the conceptualization of health as an ability opened the door for self-assessments to become the main indicators to judge the performance of efforts aimed at improving human health[16]. It also created the opportunity for every person to feel healthy, even in the presence of multiple chronic diseases, or a terminal condition, and for the re-examination of determinants of health, away from the traditional approach that focuses on the reduction of the prevalence of diseases[17].
Across 15 locations—from Portland’s four westside and three eastside offices, to our clinics in Gresham, Happy Valley, Hillsboro, Newberg, Oregon City and Tualatin—we’re a team of more than 120 physicians, certified nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners and genetic counselors committed to giving you the best care and support possible. We’re here for you--now with Portland's first out-of-hospital, natural birth center integrated with an OB/GYN specialty practice. 
WH DPG Awards Coordinator, Ginger Carney, has gathered resources regarding the intention and initiation of breastfeeding among women who are incarcerated: Interesting article from the AAFP (American Academy of Family Practitioners): https://www.aafp.org/news/health-of-the-public/20170718incarceratedbreastfeed.html Interesting power point presentation from a WIC program in California making their case: http://californiabreastfeeding.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/CBC-Breastfeeding-in-the-Incarcerated-Mother.pdf From an AWHONN (annual meeting): https://awhonn.confex.com/awhonn/2013/webprogram/Paper9198.html From Michigan: https://www.mibreastfeeding.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Incarceration-MIBFN-Policy-Position.pdf […]
Generally, the context in which an individual lives is of great importance for both his health status and quality of their life[18]. It is increasingly recognized that health is maintained and improved not only through the advancement and application of health science, but also through the efforts and intelligent lifestyle choices of the individual and society. According to the World Health Organization, the main determinants of health include the social and economic environment, the physical environment and the person's individual characteristics and behaviors.[19]
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