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Crystal’s interest in the Health At Every Size philosophy framework and the field disordered eating and eating disorders itself was sparked by both the FoodPsych podcast and the work of Marci Evans. Crystal's goal is to help each of her clients embrace flexible eating so they can live their fullest life. She specializes in nutrition for disordered eating and eating disorders, chronic dieting, and digestive, mental, and women’s health. In her work, Crystal bridges both psychology and nutrition in her approach to counseling, which allows her to provide effective therapeutic treatment. Her care is tailored to each client's unique needs utilizing a weight inclusive and compassionate practice that empowers the individual by focusing on sustainable behaviors for a healthy mind, body, and soul. Read more...
One reason erectile dysfunction becomes more common with age is that older men are more likely to be on some kind of medication. In fact, an estimated 25% of all ED is a side effect of drugs, according to the Harvard Special Health Report Erectile Dysfunction: How medication, lifestyle changes, and other therapies can help you conquer this vexing problem. The most common types of medication that are linked to ED include antidepressants, anti-ulcer drugs, tranquilizers, and diuretics—which help the body get rid of sodium and water, and are used to treat heart failure, liver failure, and certain kidney disorders. More »
Maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) is the branch of obstetrics which focuses mainly on the medical and surgical management of high-risk pregnancies that includes monitoring and treatment including comprehensive ultrasound, chorionic villus sampling, genetic amniocentesis, and fetal surgery or treatment. Obstetricians who practice maternal-fetal medicine are also known as perinatologists.
Prolonged psychological stress may negatively impact health, and has been cited as a factor in cognitive impairment with aging, depressive illness, and expression of disease.[59] Stress management is the application of methods to either reduce stress or increase tolerance to stress. Relaxation techniques are physical methods used to relieve stress. Psychological methods include cognitive therapy, meditation, and positive thinking, which work by reducing response to stress. Improving relevant skills, such as problem solving and time management skills, reduces uncertainty and builds confidence, which also reduces the reaction to stress-causing situations where those skills are applicable.
Living a healthy life means making lifestyle choices that support your physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional well-being. Managing your health can be challenging at times; while one facet of your wellness demands more attention than others, you may end up struggling to maintain a good balance in other areas. To be of sound body, mind, and spirit, it’s important to pay attention to all aspects of health—your mental, emotional, and spiritual sides all play a role in your physical welfare, and vice versa. A state of optimal well-being means more than just the absence of disease or disorder; it also means having the resources to cope with problems and circumstances beyond your control and recover from difficult or troubling situations. This intersection between health and behavior can help you prevent illness, and steer you to make better decisions about your well-being.
I subscribed to this magazine thinking it would be about health, fitness, and above all, working out. The headlines on the cover seemed to suggest that was true, with the biggest fonts advertising things like "flat abs now" and "maximize your workout". In reality, the content of the magazine is mostly beauty (how that counts as "health" is beyond me) and weight-loss. Oh, the endless, endless articles about "burn more fat!" "three new foods that will help you burn fat!" "drop pounds with this easy exercise!" I don't need to lose weight and I found that these articles just played into my growing impression, as issue after issue dropped on my doormat, that the magazine views women as vapid, stereotypical beings whose only desire is to look good, whether through exercise (almost inevitably restricted to cardio and yoga), the "right" work-out clothes (really?) or knowing what dress is in fashion or what color make-up to buy. If you enjoy that sort of thing, that's fine- it is essentially one step above Cosmopolitan on the seriousness scale. If you're looking for actual information about working out and building muscle, know that Women's Health magazine is barely aware that these things exist, and when it does, it will come wrapped in the form of "ten minutes a day to tone your bum like a super-model!" or something equally cringe-inducing.
Schedule yearly checkups with your doctor and keep these appointments. Your doctor can help monitor your weight, blood pressure, and the level of cholesterol in your blood. Excess weight, high blood pressure, and high blood cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Your doctor can recommend lifestyle changes, medications, or other treatments to help get your weight, blood pressure, and blood cholesterol under control.
About 4 months ago I started working out and my friend shared with me what had helped her lose a bit of weight and thanks to incorporating the Digestive Health with my protein shakes and the Heart Health for fat loss I have lost 15lbs since starting on Core Health Products.  I love it and I notice a difference when I take my Heart Health.  I can tell when I don’t take it.  I guess if it’s good enough for the Pro’s then it’s good enough for me!!!
One reason erectile dysfunction becomes more common with age is that older men are more likely to be on some kind of medication. In fact, an estimated 25% of all ED is a side effect of drugs, according to the Harvard Special Health Report Erectile Dysfunction: How medication, lifestyle changes, and other therapies can help you conquer this vexing problem. The most common types of medication that are linked to ED include antidepressants, anti-ulcer drugs, tranquilizers, and diuretics—which help the body get rid of sodium and water, and are used to treat heart failure, liver failure, and certain kidney disorders. More »

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month but did you realize all the pink products sold today actually contribute more to cancer? Statistics show that 50% of us will be diagnosed with cancer in our lifetime! So what you do today can either increase your changes of being diagnosed or decrease them. Watch as Shan breaks it down into simple preventive steps you can easily do to never hear the dreaded C word again.
Men's Health magazine isn't for couch potatoes, but it can help those who prefer staying indoors lead a better life. The workout poster included inside every issue pulls out, letting you hang it in your home or office to keep an eye out for simple things you can do every day to stay healthy. The poster reminds you that you need the proper amount of sleep, the right combination of healthy foods, and the perfect amount of exercise to improve your overall health. 

With a unique combination of infection protection and contamination control products and services, STERIS Corporation offers customized solutions for a variety of environments. Rely on STERIS to help you gain productivity, lower costs, and protect staff and patients throughout your Operating Room, Sterile Processing Department, GI/Endoscopy Suite, and Ambulatory Surgery Center.
Sleep is an essential component to maintaining health. In children, sleep is also vital for growth and development. Ongoing sleep deprivation has been linked to an increased risk for some chronic health problems. In addition, sleep deprivation has been shown to correlate with both increased susceptibility to illness and slower recovery times from illness.[46] In one study, people with chronic insufficient sleep, set as six hours of sleep a night or less, were found to be four times more likely to catch a cold compared to those who reported sleeping for seven hours or more a night.[47] Due to the role of sleep in regulating metabolism, insufficient sleep may also play a role in weight gain or, conversely, in impeding weight loss.[48] Additionally, in 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, which is the cancer research agency for the World Health Organization, declared that "shiftwork that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans," speaking to the dangers of long-term nighttime work due to its intrusion on sleep.[49] In 2015, the National Sleep Foundation released updated recommendations for sleep duration requirements based on age and concluded that "Individuals who habitually sleep outside the normal range may be exhibiting signs or symptoms of serious health problems or, if done volitionally, may be compromising their health and well-being."[50]
Above all, we want our clients to feel known and seen and valued. We bridge evidenced based knowledge with a Health At Every Size and Intuitive Eating approach to help our clients experience lasting physical healing from a variety of health conditions as well as healing of their whole self - because health goes far beyond the surface. We blend the heavy, emotional work with lighthearted laughter - of course this work is serious, but we also want it to be enjoyable and celebratory for our clients too! At RLWH, we strongly believe that it is never too late. There is hope for recovery and healing for anyone at anytime. 
An increasing number of studies and reports from different organizations and contexts examine the linkages between health and different factors, including lifestyles, environments, health care organization and health policy, one specific health policy brought into many countries in recent years was the introduction of the sugar tax. Beverage taxes came into light with increasing concerns about obesity, particularly among youth. Sugar-sweetened beverages have become a target of anti-obesity initiatives with increasing evidence of their link to obesity.[22]– such as the 1974 Lalonde report from Canada;[21] the Alameda County Study in California;[23] and the series of World Health Reports of the World Health Organization, which focuses on global health issues including access to health care and improving public health outcomes, especially in developing countries.[24]
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