WH DPG Awards Coordinator, Ginger Carney, has gathered resources regarding the intention and initiation of breastfeeding among women who are incarcerated: Interesting article from the AAFP (American Academy of Family Practitioners): https://www.aafp.org/news/health-of-the-public/20170718incarceratedbreastfeed.html Interesting power point presentation from a WIC program in California making their case: http://californiabreastfeeding.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/CBC-Breastfeeding-in-the-Incarcerated-Mother.pdf From an AWHONN (annual meeting): https://awhonn.confex.com/awhonn/2013/webprogram/Paper9198.html From Michigan: https://www.mibreastfeeding.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Incarceration-MIBFN-Policy-Position.pdf […]
Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are sold directly to consumers without a prescription. There are approximately 800 OTC active ingredients available today that constitute more than 300,000 OTC medicines in the healthcare marketplace. They are sold in more than 750,000 retail outlets including pharmacies, grocery stores, convenience stores, mass merchandise retailers, etc. Like prescription drugs, OTC medicines are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and are safe and effective when used as directed. The Drug Facts label instructs consumers on how to properly choose and use them. OTCs treat many common ailments including pain, fever, cough and cold, upset stomach, and allergies.
NHPs are safe to consume and generally have less side effects than traditional drug medications. However, NHP are not risk free and have potential for some risks. These may come about from manufacturing problems (contamination, incorrect dose), misrepresented or unproven claims on the label, unexpected side effects (allergic reaction), or interaction with other medication/NHPs also being consumed. It has been reported that 12% of Canadians have experienced unwanted side effects due to the consumption of NHPs. It is recommended that you do your research and consult a health care professional if you are concerned with the potential risks.[5]
Here at Real Life Women's Health, we work through a non diet, whole person approach to help you heal from the inside. Whether you're battling disordered eating or an eating disorder - or faced with hormonal issues like PCOS, thyroid disorders, a missing or irregular period, PMS, PMDD, or other reproductive health and fertility issues - we'll help you heal physically and heal your relationship with food, your body and yourself. Because health is not about nutritional minutiae and calories, it's about tuning into your own body's wisdom, learning to truly care for yourself and living out your values with meaning and purpose. 
We want to be your first source for rehabilitation, physical therapy, chiropractic, exercise, and other products that promote health and wellness. We work hard to keep as large an inventory of healthcare products in stock as possible so that our customers can benefit from fast and reliable customer service. Please browse the thousands of products in our online catalog. If you need help finding something, please ask us.
The focus of public health interventions is to prevent and manage diseases, injuries and other health conditions through surveillance of cases and the promotion of healthy behavior, communities, and (in aspects relevant to human health) environments. Its aim is to prevent health problems from happening or re-occurring by implementing educational programs, developing policies, administering services and conducting research.[52] In many cases, treating a disease or controlling a pathogen can be vital to preventing it in others, such as during an outbreak. Vaccination programs and distribution of condoms to prevent the spread of communicable diseases are examples of common preventive public health measures, as are educational campaigns to promote vaccination and the use of condoms (including overcoming resistance to such).

Since the late 1970s, the federal Healthy People Initiative has been a visible component of the United States’ approach to improving population health.[11][12] In each decade, a new version of Healthy People is issued,[13] featuring updated goals and identifying topic areas and quantifiable objectives for health improvement during the succeeding ten years, with assessment at that point of progress or lack thereof. Progress has been limited to many objectives, leading to concerns about the effectiveness of Healthy People in shaping outcomes in the context of a decentralized and uncoordinated US health system. Healthy People 2020 gives more prominence to health promotion and preventive approaches and adds a substantive focus on the importance of addressing social determinants of health. A new expanded digital interface facilitates use and dissemination rather than bulky printed books as produced in the past. The impact of these changes to Healthy People will be determined in the coming years.[14]
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