One reason erectile dysfunction becomes more common with age is that older men are more likely to be on some kind of medication. In fact, an estimated 25% of all ED is a side effect of drugs, according to the Harvard Special Health Report Erectile Dysfunction: How medication, lifestyle changes, and other therapies can help you conquer this vexing problem. The most common types of medication that are linked to ED include antidepressants, anti-ulcer drugs, tranquilizers, and diuretics—which help the body get rid of sodium and water, and are used to treat heart failure, liver failure, and certain kidney disorders. More »

After skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosis among American men, reports the American Cancer Society. If you have trouble urinating, develop pain when you urinate, or notice blood in your urine, it may be a sign of prostate problems. Make an appointment with your doctor. They may encourage you to get blood tests or undergo a prostate exam to check for prostate cancer or other conditions.
The effects of a women's diet on her children start long before she becomes pregnant. Storage of fat, protein, and other nutrients built up over the years are called upon during pregnancy for fetal nourishment. These kinds of food provide women with plenty of energy, the means for lifelong weight control, and the key ingredients for looking and feeling great at any age.
Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care is a peer-reviewed, international, indexed hybrid journal which offers dual mode of publication, open access & subscription. This mode provides the means to maximize the visibility, citations and readership which enhance the impact of the research work and provides a range of options to purchase our articles and also permits unlimited Internet Access to complete Journal content. It accepts research, review papers, online letters to the editors & brief comments on previously published articles or other relevant findings in SciTechnol. Articles submitted by authors are evaluated by a group of peer review experts in the field and ensures that the published articles are of high quality, reflect solid scholarship in their fields, and that the information they contain is accurate and reliable.
Schedule yearly checkups with your doctor and keep these appointments. Your doctor can help monitor your weight, blood pressure, and the level of cholesterol in your blood. Excess weight, high blood pressure, and high blood cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Your doctor can recommend lifestyle changes, medications, or other treatments to help get your weight, blood pressure, and blood cholesterol under control.
Digestive Health is my new Favorite Item!!!  I have dealt with IBS since I was little and I started taking Digestive Health about 8 months ago.  I noticed a huge difference the first day I took it.  Ten minutes after taking Digestive Health I noticed a difference.  I am now sharing with all my family as they have also had the same issues.  I am grateful for this product.
The Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) is the 137-year-old national trade association representing the leading manufacturers and marketers of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines and dietary supplements. Every dollar spent by consumers on OTC medicines saves the U.S. healthcare system $6-$7, contributing a total of $102 billion in savings each year. CHPA is committed to empowering consumer self-care by preserving and expanding choice and availability of consumer healthcare products.

The referenced committee has scheduled a meeting with remote access to be held Wednesday, November 7th. The meeting will be held November 7, 2018, 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. ET and November 8, 2018, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. ET in-person and by webinar and teleconference. The address for the meeting is DoubleTree by Hilton, Bethesda, 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland […]
We believe in an weight neutral, non diet, body positive approach that focuses on changing behaviors to promote lifelong health and wellbeing. We believe that true health does not include micromanaging your body size, controlling food or living by a set of rules. And health surely and is not defined by numbers. Rather, we believe true health means eating, moving and caring for yourself in a way that supports your body's physical, mental and emotional needs. Physical healing must address all aspects of health, not just what you eat and how you exercise. We believe that in order to experience optimal physical health and especially hormonal health, you have to consider and care for your emotional and mental health. Peace with food and your body is the gateway to living a healthful, purposeful, and meaningful life aligned with your values.
WH DPG Awards Coordinator, Ginger Carney, has gathered resources regarding the intention and initiation of breastfeeding among women who are incarcerated: Interesting article from the AAFP (American Academy of Family Practitioners): https://www.aafp.org/news/health-of-the-public/20170718incarceratedbreastfeed.html Interesting power point presentation from a WIC program in California making their case: http://californiabreastfeeding.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/CBC-Breastfeeding-in-the-Incarcerated-Mother.pdf From an AWHONN (annual meeting): https://awhonn.confex.com/awhonn/2013/webprogram/Paper9198.html From Michigan: https://www.mibreastfeeding.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Incarceration-MIBFN-Policy-Position.pdf […]
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month but did you realize all the pink products sold today actually contribute more to cancer? Statistics show that 50% of us will be diagnosed with cancer in our lifetime! So what you do today can either increase your changes of being diagnosed or decrease them. Watch as Shan breaks it down into simple preventive steps you can easily do to never hear the dreaded C word again.
The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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