The Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care (JWHIC) promotes latest research that makes a significant contribution in advancing knowledge on the prevention, diagnosis and management of issues related to women in global context. Journal of Women’s health includes a wide range of fields in its discipline like Obstetrics/Gynecology, Sex-Based Biology, Women: Postmenopausal Health, Women: Mental Health, Pregnancy and Reproductive Health, Gynecology Oncology, Child Birth, Autoimmune Disorders, Psychological Disorders, Women Care, Internal Medicine & Women Issues, Endocrinology.
Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care is a peer-reviewed, international, indexed hybrid journal which offers dual mode of publication, open access & subscription. This mode provides the means to maximize the visibility, citations and readership which enhance the impact of the research work and provides a range of options to purchase our articles and also permits unlimited Internet Access to complete Journal content. It accepts research, review papers, online letters to the editors & brief comments on previously published articles or other relevant findings in SciTechnol. Articles submitted by authors are evaluated by a group of peer review experts in the field and ensures that the published articles are of high quality, reflect solid scholarship in their fields, and that the information they contain is accurate and reliable.
All WIC RDs: Please respond directly to Dawn Ballosingh, WH DPG Chair, at dballosingh@oneworldomaha.org to collate on behalf of the group or fill out the form and send it to Mark (mrifkin@eatright.org) directly. Deadline is November 2nd. The Policy Initiatives and Advocacy office is specifically seeking your input on these comment opportunities.  Research, PN, NEP, DIFM, WM, WH, […]

Finding a moment to take a few deep breaths and quiet your mind is a great way to relieve stress and improve your overall health. That’s what mindfulness is all about. The Breathe app on Apple Watch and many other third-party experiences help you decompress and stay centered throughout your day. Whichever apps you choose, Health adds up the numbers to show you how much time you’ve spent being mindful.

The maintenance and promotion of health is achieved through different combination of physical, mental, and social well-being, together sometimes referred to as the "health triangle."[25][26] The WHO's 1986 Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion further stated that health is not just a state, but also "a resource for everyday life, not the objective of living. Health is a positive concept emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities."[27]

We offer one-on-one and group sessions to clients locally in Boston and also anywhere with telehealth. The majority of our clients are at a distance, so we meet via video using a secure online platform. After filling out the form below, you can expect a reply within 48 hours (M-F) from our administrative staff with more information including appointment availability, scheduling, insurance information and paperwork to fill out before your first visit. We look forward to working with you!
Smoking is one of the worst things you can do for your health. Secondhand smoke is also very dangerous. Nearly 7,300 nonsmoking Americans die from lung cancer caused by secondhand smoke every year, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Smoking and secondhand smoke exposure can also cause other health conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema, and heart disease. They also raise your risk of developing many types of cancer.

Frankly, looking around, it seems your choice is either a magazine that barely addresses fitness, or going straight to the hardcore muscle-building mags. I was hoping for something reasonably in-between with Women's Health, but failed to find it. If someone knows of such a magazine, I'd be interested to hear it (I tried Women's Fitness, which suffers from the same problems as Women's Health). The good news is that my subscription to Women's Health seemed to get me a good price on Men's Health, which I am switching over to because some reviewers recommended it for those disappointed with the content of WH. I'll see how that works out.
Just as there was a shift from viewing disease as a state to thinking of it as a process, the same shift happened in definitions of health. Again, the WHO played a leading role when it fostered the development of the health promotion movement in the 1980s. This brought in a new conception of health, not as a state, but in dynamic terms of resiliency, in other words, as "a resource for living". 1984 WHO revised the definition of health defined it as "the extent to which an individual or group is able to realize aspirations and satisfy needs and to change or cope with the environment. Health is a resource for everyday life, not the objective of living; it is a positive concept, emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities".[10] Thus, health referred to the ability to maintain homeostasis and recover from insults. Mental, intellectual, emotional and social health referred to a person's ability to handle stress, to acquire skills, to maintain relationships, all of which form resources for resiliency and independent living.[9] This opens up many possibilities for health to be taught, strengthened and learned.
×