No matter what your health care goals or what wellness products you’re looking for, we’ll make the shopping process easy and convenient. Our Customer Service Representatives are ready to help you find just what you need, via telephone, mail, fax, email or even online live chat. When you’re ready to order, use our catalog quick shop or search DrLeonards.com to find products to meet your individual needs. You can also choose to shop from our Virtual Catalog to bring the catalog shopping experience to your computer, page by page. No matter how you prefer to shop Dr. Leonard’s, your satisfaction is our top priority. If for any reason you are not 100% satisfied with any product you purchase from us, you may return it for a prompt refund.
Digestive Health is my new Favorite Item!!!  I have dealt with IBS since I was little and I started taking Digestive Health about 8 months ago.  I noticed a huge difference the first day I took it.  Ten minutes after taking Digestive Health I noticed a difference.  I am now sharing with all my family as they have also had the same issues.  I am grateful for this product.
I wanted to let you know that your Tuli's heel cup really helped me with a lingering heel pain that was severely impacting my ability to get around.  After getting a pair of the Classic Heel cups the discomfort was "significantly" reduced and continues to show improvement.  We are back up to a mile and I am a very pleased customer.  I may try your Cheetah wrap next since I also have some swelling on that same foot. Great Product! Thank You!

The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[7] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[8] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[9]
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